League Promotes Police Department Certification

At the November 30 General Membership meeting, The League unanimously endorsed the St. Louis Area Police Chiefs Associations (SLAPCA), “Law Enforcement Best Practices Agreement”.

In September of 2016 the League started meeting with SLAPCA to develop a set of best practices for St. Louis area police departments.  The first part of this year, SLAPCA established a subcommittee to work toward developing a policy or set of standards.  The committee was Chaired by Chief Tim Lowery of Florissant.  The committee included chiefs from St. Louis County, St. Charles County, the St. Louis Area City Managers (SLACMA) and the Leageu.

Ultimately, the committee developed the Best Practice Agreement which calls for all police agency to adopt certain polices by January 1, 2019 and to be fully accredited by January 1, 2022 (accreditation is a three year process) as a requirement for membership in SLAPCA.  SLAPCA’s membership includes St. Charles agencies as well and the agreement was unanimously approved by their membership in October.

SLACMA, adopted the agreement earlier this month and the General Membership of the League unanimously endorsed the agreement on November 30.  The motion included compliance with the agreement as a condition of 2017 11 30 SLAPCA Best Practices Finalmembership in the League.

City of St. Louis and St. Louis County Intergovernmental Collaboration Study

The study examined nearly all service delivery areas within the City and the County governments. The goal of the study was to identify initiatives that have the potential to create financial savings for both governments or enhance existing service levels for the citizens in the St. Louis region. It is our opinion that substantial opportunities exist in a variety of areas. We are encouraged that as we shared our findings and recommendations with both leaders in both the City and County, some of our findings and recommendations are already being discussed and studied for possible implementation.City County Intergovernmental Collaboration Study PFM

Call for Public Comment – Transportation Alternatives Program

East-West Gateway is seeking public comment on the 21 pedestrian- and bicycle-focused transportation projects recently recommended for funding through the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP). You can find details regarding the program and submit your comments online by visiting the East-West Gateway website. Comments can also be mailed to East-West Gateway Council of Governments ATTN: TAP, One South Memorial Drive, Suite 1600, St. Louis, MO 63102. The public comment period runs through Tuesday, Sept. 5.

UMSL Chancellor’s Certificate in Fundamentals of Planning and Zoning

The Chancellor’s Certificate in Fundamentals of Planning and Zoning from the University of Missouri-St.Louis is a seven-module course taught by a team of senior practitioners that covers planning practices, processes and other topics crucial for local government success. The program is designed for municipal and county planning and zoning commissioners, elected officials, municipal staff, and citizens interested in the planning and zoning process. Modules are held weekly on Thursdays from 6-9 p.m., Oct. 12 to Dec. 7 (no class on Oct. 19 and Nov. 23) at the J.C. Penney Conference Center on UMSL’s campus. You can register online for individual modules for $75 each or all seven for $400.

Missouri Lt. Governor Parson: There have been record crowds everyday at State Fair

SEDALIA- Missouri’s Lieutenant Governor says there has been record attendance at this year’s State Fair.

Lt. Governor Mike Parson prepares to ride a horse carriage at the Missouri State Fair on August 17, 2017 (Brian Hauswirth photo)

About 350,000 people attended the 2016 Missouri State Fair.

Lieutenant Governor Mike Parson (R), whose former State Senatorial district included the Fairgrounds, tells Missourinet there were about 1,000 people at the Governor’s ham breakfast on Thursday.

“Last (Wednesday) night we had a small reception here that we had, there were over 300 people here, there’s been record crowds everyday,” Parson says. “So every event that we’ve had so far, the numbers have just been huge.”

Parson credits good weather, adding that people are excited about Missouri’s future.

The Bolivar Republican attended Thursday’s ham breakfast on the Fairgrounds, and spoke at a morning agriculture rally.

“It’s always great to be at the State Fair, it’s just a great time of the year to showcase Missouri’s agriculture,” says Parson. “You know, I still come here, me and my family still come here. It’s just part of who we are.”

The 65th Governor’s ham breakfast featured lawmakers, commodity group leaders and State Fair supporters.

Parson says the Missouri State Fairgrounds are now used 12 months a year.

“The State Fairgrounds is used internationally now, events throughout the United States that come here all the way from car rallies to bicycle rallies, way beyond agriculture, way beyond the animals,” Parson says.

Parson notes the Fairgrounds are open to the public, adding that the State Fair in Sedalia is one of the best in the nation.

Thursday was also Legislators and Judges Day.

Governor Eric Greitens (R) spoke at the breakfast and later addressed reporters, outside the Director’s tent.

Greitens tells Missourinet he’s not ruling out calling another special session this year.

“We’re obviously keeping every option on the table as we move forward and right now I’m really, really pleased with where we’re at. We’ve had two great results from our two special sessions thus far,” Greitens says.

Greitens called two special sessions this summer: one involving the Noranda/steel mill bill and the second was abortion-related legislation.

Friday is Missouri Electric Cooperatives Day at the State Fair, which ends Sunday.

St. Louis County Council resolution tries, but can’t actually dictate how Prop P money spent

In an effort to block municipalities from using a recently passed “public safety” tax increase on things like potholes and snow removal, the St. Louis County Council passed a resolution Tuesday asking for the money be strictly spent on policing.

Problem is, the resolution doesn’t actually do anything.

Councilman Mark Harder said the resolution, which he sponsored, is meant to make clear “when the voters voted on this, they knew that this was supposed to go to law enforcement and to help our police.”

But Harder, R-Ballwin, said the council would have to go back to voters in order to be able to dictate how the 89 municipalities spend their share of the roughly $36 million that’ll start coming in in early October.

“From a legal standpoint, nothing’s going to happen because the St. Louis County Council doesn’t govern Chesterfield,” Harder said Monday. “They can do what they want with this money even today. What we’re trying to do and what I’m trying to do is this resolution is to remind everyone of the original intent. And 95 percent of the municipalities are going to use this the way they intended.”

While Harder’s resolution passed without opposition, several councilmembers, including Councilman Ernie Trakas, R-St. Louis County, and Councilwoman Rochelle Walton Gray, D-Black Jack, said they almost voted against it because it didn’t force cities to spend the money on policing.

Voters could recall local elected officials that spend Prop P money on non-law enforcement related items, St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger said in a statement earlier this month.

But Ellisville Mayor Adam Paul said Stenger and the council should have written more specific language when they sent Prop P to voters in April.

“Ballot language is very, very important. And words have meanings. And when it says ‘public safety,’ that is a broad stroke terminology to cover a lot of different areas,” said Paul, who ran against Harder three years ago when the council seat was open.

Both Paul and Ferguson Mayor James Knowles said their cities plan to use their Prop P funds to raise police salaries. But Knowles agreed with other mayors that the plan wasn’t well thought-out, especially since a town’s share of the Prop P money is determined by population — not crime.

“It is kind of ill-conceived because what we’ve done here is communities like Chesterfield and Wildwood …They’ve been given this money,” Knowles said. “People would love to say it blanketly ‘Well, give it to police,’ but as it’s been said are you going to give cops $80,000, $90,000 or $100,000 salaries?”

About $46 million from Proposition P is slated to go to the St. Louis County Police Department for officer raises and equipment upgrades. Harder said he’s drafting an ordinance specifying how the county can spend that money.

2017 MUNI Awards Honors Local Governments

The Municipal League of Metro St. Louis announced the winners of its 2017 MUNI Awards during a ceremony at its May 31st meeting. The following cities and individuals were recognized for their accomplishment:

    • Citizen Engagement — Presented to the City of Crestwood for its “Christmas in Crestwood” program.
    • Collaboration — Presented to the St. Louis Area Insurance Trust (SLAIT) for creating a local insurance pool.
    • Policy Initiative — Presented to the city of Maryland Heights for operational and staffing assessments of its police department.
    • Public Safety — Presented to the city of Vinita Park for the creation of the North County Police Cooperative.
    • Sustainability — Presented to the city of Creve Coeur for their efforts to promote environmental consciousness.
    • Buzz Westfall Award for Excellence in Local Government — Presented to Florissant Mayor Tom Schneider for his lifetime of services and in particular his leadership in last year’s efforts to retain the out-of-state auto sales tax.

Photo Credit: City of Florissant Facebook page. Pictured (l-r) is Ward 2 Councilman Tim Jones, Ward 7 Council President
Jackie Pagano, Ward 8 Councilman Robert Parson, Mayor Thomas Schneider,
Ward 5 Councilman Keith Schildroth and Ward 4 Councilman Jeff Caputa

 

Current Legislative Updates

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Week Ending 5/5/17

 

The legislature is continuing with hearings on many priority bills. A large number of  bills are now starting to come out of committee for floor debate.  New bills and changes from last week are in red.  Bills which have not been perfected have been deleted.  Bills which have not passed one chamber have been lined through.  The session ends next Friday May 12, so there will be no report that day.

Court Bills

HB 380 (Plocher) – Changes and creates provisions relating to minor traffic violations in municipal court.  Amended to prohibit the use of automated traffic enforcement systems.  General Laws Committee.  Heard 2/14.  Passed Committee 2/21.  Referred to Rules Committee.  Heard 3/27.  Passed Committee 3/27.  Perfected 4/19.  3rd Reading Calendar.

Economic Development Bills

SB 411 (Schatz) – Amended in House to change all municipal TIF commissions to 9 members.  TIF projects would also require approval from State Department of Economic Development.  Returned to Senate for consideration of House amendments.

Elections, Ethics  and  Term Limit Bills

 HB 229 (Dogan) – Prohibits lobbyists from giving gifts to local government officials.  General Laws Committee.  Heard 1/31.  Passed Committee 2/7.  Referred Rules Committee.  Passed Committee 2/16.  Perfected 3/14.  Passed House 3/27.  Senate Rules Committee

HB 353 (Eggleston) – Increase population limit to 2000 for cities to forgo elections if the number of candidates equals the number of open seats.  Elections Committee.  Heard 1/25.  Passed Committee 2/2.  Referred Rules Committee.  Passed Committee 2/9.  Perfected 3/6.  Passed House 3/8.  Senate Local Government Committee.  Heard 3/28.  Passed Committee 3/30.  Senate 3rd Reading Calendar

SB 111 (Hegeman) – Amended in House to require that anyone running for office at a municipal, city, county, or statewide level must use their legal last name or maiden name.  Passed House 4/26.  Returned to Senate for consideration of House amendments.

 Employment & Wage Bills

HB 104 (Love) – Repeals provisions relating to prevailing wages on public works projects.  Economic Development Committee.  Heard 1/31.  Passed Committee 2/28.  Referred Rules Committee.  Passed Committee 3/8.  Perfected 3/28.  Passed House 3/30.  Senate General Laws Committee.  Heard 4/6.  Passed Committee 4/6.  Senate Informal 3rd Reading Calendar.

HB 251 (Taylor) – Requires authorization for public labor unions to use dues and fees to make political contributions and requires consent for withholding earnings from paychecks.  Economic Development Committee.  Heard 1/24.  Passed Committee 1/25.  Referred Rules Committee.  Passed Rules Committee 1/31.  Perfection Calendar.  Perfected 2/7.  Passed House 2/9.  Senate General Laws Committee.  Heard 2/22.  Passed Committee 2/22.  Senate Informal 3rd Read Calendar.

General Government Bills

HB 126 (Vescovo) – Modifies provisions relating to fairness in public construction.  Economic Development Committee.  Heard 1/31.  Passed Committee 1/31.  Referred Rules Committee.   Heard 2/13.  Passed Rules Committee 2/13.  Perfected 2/15.  Passed House 2/16.  Senate General Laws Committee

HB 451 (Austin) – Specifies that a change in population shall not remove a city, county, or political subdivision from the operation of a law.  Local Government Committee.  Heard 2/13.  Passed Committee 2/13.  Passed Rules Committee 2/15.  Perfected 2/27.  Passed House 3/2.  Senate Local Government Committee.  Heard 3/28.  Passed Committee 3/30.  Senate Informal 3rd Reading Calendar

HB 849 (Pfautsch) –  Political subdivisions not filing annual financial reports with the auditor subject to $500 per day fine.  Government Efficiency Committee.  Heard 3/14.  Passed Committee 3/28.  Referred Rules Committee.  Passed Committee.  Perfected 4/12.  Passed House 4/18.  Senate Ways & Means Committee. Heard 4/26.  Passed Committee 4/26.  Senate 3rd Reading Calendar

SB 95 (Sater) – Amended in House committee to change the law regarding the sale of public bonds to require political subdivisions to issue debt at public sale.  Passed Rules Committee 4/26

SB 111 (Hegeman) – Amended in House to change the law regarding the sale of public bonds to require political subdivisions to issue debt at public sale.  Passed House 4/26.  Returned to Senate for consideration of House amendments.

SB 112 (Schatz) –  Amended in House to require political subdivisions not filing annual financial reports with the auditor be subject to $500 per day fine.  Also amended to change the law regarding the sale of public bonds to require political subdivisions to issue debt at public sale.  House 3rd Reading Calendar

SB 124 (Wasson) – Provides that change in population shall not remove a city, county or political subdivision from operation of a law.  Local Government/Elections Committee. Heard 1/31.  Passed Committee 2/7.  Perfected 3/29.  Passed Senate 3/30.  House Economic Development Committee.  Heard 4/11.  Passed Committee 4/26.  Referred rules Committee

SB 302 (Wieland) – Amended in House to change the law regarding the sale of public bonds to require political subdivisions to issue debt at public sale.  Passed House.  Returned to Senate for consideration of House amendments. 

Land Use Bills

HB 608 (Anderson) – Prohibits political subdivisions from enforcing or enacting ordinances that prohibit residential dwelling rentals, or have the effect of prohibiting their rental. Ordinances in effect prior to January 1, 2018, may be enforced.  Taxes to be collected.  Amended to prohibit municipalities from conducting interior property inspections of residences through a residential property licensing ordinance.  General Laws Committee.  Heard 2/21.  Passed Committee 3/7.  Referred Rules Committee.  Passed Committee 3/16.  Perfected 4/20.  Passed House 4/27

Police & Public Safety Bills

HB 57 (Haefner) – Adds to the list of hate crimes certain offenses committed against law enforcement officers and first responders when the offenses are committed because the person is a law enforcement officer or first responder.  Crime Prevention & Public Safety Committee.  Public Safety Committee.  Heard 1/18.  Passed Committee 1/31.  Referred Rules Committee.  Passed Committee 2/7.  Perfected 2/14. Passed House 2/16.  Senate Criminal Jurisprudence Committee.  Heard 4/10.  Passed Committee 4/12.  Senate 3rd Reading Calendar.

HB 334 (Lauer) – Change the law regarding emergency communications services.  Utilities Committee.  Heard 2/1.  Passed Committee 2/8.  Referred Rules Committee.  Heard 3/6.  Passed Committee 3/9.  Perfected 4/12.  Passed House 4/18.  Senate Commerce Committee.  Heard 4/26.  Passed Committee 4/27.  Senate 3rd Reading Calendar

SB 34 (Cunningham) – Amended in House to prohibit the use of traffic cameras.  Passed House.  Returned to Senate for consideration of House amendments.

Tax Bills

HB 935 (Haefner) – Allows St. Louis City and St. Louis County to propose a 1/8th of a cent sales tax to fund the St. Louis Zoo.  Residents of other counties could pay an entrance fee.  Local Government Committee.  Heard 3/8.  Passed Committee 3/15.  Referred Rules Committee.  Passed Committee 3/29.  Perfected 4/12.  Passed House 4/18. Senate Health Committee.  Heard 4/26.  Passed Committee 4/26.  Senate 3rd Reading Calendar

SB 49 (Walsh) – Allows St. Louis City and St. Louis County to propose a 1/8th of a cent sales tax to fund the St. Louis Zoo.  Residents of other counties could pay an entrance fee.    Progress & Development Committee.  Heard 2/8.  Passed Committee 2/15.  Perfected 4/13.  Passed Senate 4/27.   House Local Government Committee.  Heard 5/3.  Passed Committee 5/3.  Referred Rules Committee

SB 112 (Schatz) – Amended in House to authorize public safety sales tax for Eureka, Pacific and Rock Hill.  House 3rd Reading Calendar.

SB 114 (Schatz) – Amended in House to authorize public safety sales tax for Eureka, Pacific and Rock Hill.  House 3rd Reading Calendar.

SB 134 (Chappelle-Nadal ) – Amended in House to authorize public safety sales tax for Eureka, Pacific and Rock Hill.  House 3rd Reading Calendar.

Transportation Bills

HB 275 (Spencer) – Prohibits the use of automated traffic enforcement systems, and requires any political subdivision to complete or terminate any automated traffic enforcement contract within one year.  Government Oversight Committee.  Heard 1/24.  Passed Committee 1/31.  Referred Rules Committee.  Passed Committee 3/1.  Perfected 3/29.  Passed House 4/3.  Senate Transportation Committee

Utility Bills

HB 142 (Berry) – Authorizes telephone companies to elect to have their tangible personal property assessed in accordance with a depreciation schedule.  Ways & Committee.  Heard 1/23.  Passed Committee 2/13.  Referred Rules Committee.  Heard 3/6.  Passed Committee 3/9.  Perfected 3/29.  Passed House 4/3.  Senate CommerceCommittee.  Heard 4/26.  Passed Committee 4/27.  Senate 3rd Reading Calendar

HB 340 (Fitzwater) – Changes provisions of law related to net metering.  Utilities Committee.  Heard 2/15.  Passed Committee 3/1.  Referred Rules Committee.  Heard 3/13.  Passed Committee 3/16.  Perfected  3/29.  Passed  House 4/3.  Senate Commerce Committee.

HB 656 (Rhodes) – Changes the law regarding the uniform wireless communication infrastructure deployment act.  Utilities Committee. The Substitute bill virtually eliminates municipal authority over the public rights-of-way and places gross receipts business licenses and other fees on wireless service providers in jeopardy.   Heard 2/22.  Passed Committee 3/8.  Referred Rules Committee. Hearing 3/29.  Passed Committee 3/29.  Perfected 4/11.  Passed House 4/13.  Senate Commerce Committee. Heard 4/26.  Passed Committee 4/27.  Senate 3rd Reading Calendar